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Cordless Tracksaw Comparison | Makita 36v vs Dewalt 60v Vs Festool 36v

Which tracksaw should I buy?

With many manufacturers getting into the game of tracksaws, it is hard to decide which one to purchase. To add even more confusion, the lithium-ion battery powered tracksaws are hitting the market and taking it by storm. There are many factors that should go into picking a tracksaw and we are going to cover them today. From the tracksaw to the track, we will cover various features, specs, and applications along the way and at the end, we will give you our pick if we were to go out and buy one. We are going to be covering Dewalt’s 60 FLEXVOLT DCS520T1 tracksaw, Makita’s 36v XPS01 tracksaw, and Festool’s 36v TSC 55 tracksaw. And to compare it to a corded model, we are going to use Festool’s corded TS55 that has been the king of tracksaws since they have been invented. We will touch on corded vs. cordless as well.

Plunge Mechanism

After testing all of these tracksaw units and using Festools corded TS55 for many years in our professional woodworking shop, we believe the plunge mechanism on a tracksaw is very important. There are basically two mechanisms that are on the various tracksaws on the market today. A single pivot point or a parallel mechanism. To our knowledge, the Dewalt tracksaw is the only saw with the parallel mechanism on the market today. The Makita and both Festool (battery and corded) have a single pivot point. Below are a few criteria we developed when taking a closer look at the units.

  • Mechanism type
  • How smooth is it?
  • How much resistance is there?
  • Does it seem safe?
  • How smooth is the mechanism release?

Dewalt 60v FLEXVOLT Tracksaw

The Parallel plunge mechanism on the Dewalt 60v FLEXVOLT tracksaw is certainly unique. The unit requires you to push forward and down at the same time. A single pivot mechanism as the same required motions (forward and down) but the mechanics are different. We believe the saw is tough to start the mechanism but once you get it started, it is smooth and has enough resistance to the motion that it makes you feel safe. We would also argue two points to the safety factor of the parallel mechanism. First, it should, in theory, be safer than a single pivot point mechanism because you are making the saw move forward as you are making the cut. This reduces the chances of kickback. But secondly, if you are not used to the parallel mechanism, it could cause the user a little hesitance and therefore cancel out any increased safety factor. We also feel the mechanism to unlock the parallel mechanism is a bit cumbersome as the release has a little bit of a longer stroke.

Makita 36v x2 Tracksaw

This will be short and sweet.The single pivot point on the Makita 36v x2 Tracksaw is very smooth. T

The single pivot point on the Makita 36v x2 Tracksaw is very smooth. The release mechanism is a simple push button instead of a sliding mechanism. My only concern with the plunge mechanism is it was too smooth. We didn’t feel there was enough resistance to keep the user honest. This could also decrease the safety factor as the user may plunge too quickly into the material and cause a kickback.

Festool TSC 55 Tracksaw

In our opinion, the Festool TSC 55 had the best all around the mechanism. It is the same as the corded Festool model so we are most likely bias with that unit being in our shop for more than 5 years now. The mechanism on the Festool TSC 55 tracksaw is smooth with enough resistance to give the user some feedback when making the plunging action.

Variable Speed

All saws that were tested in this shootout are variable speed. Variable speed on a tracksaw is very important if you cut a variety of materials. A slower blade speed will cause less heat and this is absolutely necessary when cutting certain materials. We will touch on a few specs of the units below:

Dewalt 60v FLEXVOLT Tracksaw

Settings 1-7 on a dial that gives the unit a no load speed of 1,750 – 4,000 RPM

Makita 36v x2 Tracksaw

Settings 1-5 on a dial gives the unit a no load speed of 2,500 – 6,300 RPM

Festool TSC 55 Tracksaw

Settings 1-6 on a dial that gives the unit a no load speed of 2,650 – 5,200 RPM

Bevel Capacity and Adjustment

When a user needs to make a precise bevel on a piece of material that typically requires the table saw, we like to use a tracksaw for the accuracy. There are a few criteria we established when reviewing the bevel capacity and adjustment on each of the tracksaws:

  • Bevel range
  • Adjustment mechanism
  • Imperial or metric
  • Other special features

Dewalt 60v FLEXVOLT Tracksaw

The bevel range on the Dewalt 60v FLEXVOLT tracksaw has a bit of a downside to it. It, of course, has a full bevel capacity of 47 degrees but is lacking in a -1-degree bevel option for back cutting material. The mechanism is very smooth and adjusts like the other two units do, with two knobs. One on the front and one on the back. Loosen the knobs and set the indicator on the scale to your desired degree and lock the knobs back in place.

Makita 36v x2 Tracksaw

The bevel range on the Makita 36v x2 Tracksaw takes the cake in this department. It has a bevel capacity of -1 to 48 degrees with positive stops at 22.5 and 45 degrees. The mechanism for adjusting the bevel is just like the other two units. It has a knob in the front and another one in the back. Loosen both of these and the base can be angled. The angle scale marks are highlighted in white on the black background. This makes them easy to see and read. The indicator point is in orange and is easy to read but looks like it could move on you. To utilize the detents, there are is a second knob that allows the unit to go into the 22.5-degree detent. If the user would like a hard stop at 45 degrees, they can use a small lever to the right of the scale when facing it. You can push that to get the hardstop at 45 degrees or even 48 degrees.

Festool TSC 55 Tracksaw

The bevel range on the Festool TSC 55 is the second best between the three models. It has a full bevel capacity of 47 degrees and also had a -1-degree bevel option for back cutting material. The best part about the -1-degree bevel option is the safety mechanism. The user doesn’t have to rely on precisely setting the saw at 0-degrees. There is a hard stop at 0-degrees and a green lever to allow the saw to move to the -1-degree bevel position. The indicator is not a contrasting color but the scale is a white while the background is black. Easy to see and read.

Depth Adjustment

When a tracksaw user is cutting material, they need to properly set the depth of the blade so it doesn’t cut too deeply into whatever is below the material they are cutting. The user typically will cut on a couple length of scrap material or on some rigid foam. Setting the depth of cut needs to be fast, precise, and easy to understand. We covered the following points when reviewing the height adjustment feature:

  • Scale (Imperial or metric)
  • Adjustment mechanism (knob or push style)
  • Easy of use
  • Total depth of cut

Dewalt 60v FLEXVOLT Tracksaw

The scale on the Dewalt has the best position in this area between the three units. It is imperial. For us in America that is still on the Imperial system, we really enjoy that. The indicator and scale markings are in a bright Dewalt yellow that are easy to see and read. The mechanism for the Dewalt 60v FLEXVOLT tracksaw has a knob style. This means you need to loosen the knob and then move the stop point and cursor. The knob mechanism is by far the least favorite of the two different styles. We feel it is a bit cumbersome to use and the push style is easier to use. In addition to the general knob mechanism being a bit cumbersome, we feel the knob on the Dewalt tracksaw is smaller and sometimes tough to set.

Total depth of cut at 90 degrees WITH the track – 2-1/8″

Total depth of cut at 45 degrees WITH the track – 1-5/8″

Makita 36v x2 Tracksaw

The scale and mechanism are very similar on the Makita 36v x2 tracksaw when compared to the Dewalt FLEXVOLT unit but what makes the Makita unit a bit better is the knob style. The knob is more of a wing-nut style rather than a round knob. This allows the user to get much more grip and set it firmly. The smoothness of the depth adjustment is very nice when compared with the Dewalt. Makita’s unit has a nice easy to read metric scale. Makita’s saw has a unique scoring depth-stop to cut 2-3mm into your material to provide a clean and splinter-free cut.

Total depth of cut at 90 degrees WITH the track – 2-3/16″

Total depth of cut at 45 degrees WITH the track – 1-9/16″

Festool TSC 55 Tracksaw

The depth adjustment on the Festool TSC 55 is the clear front runner in this comparison. This unit features a push style depth adjustment mechanism rather than a knob. This allows the user to quickly move the mechanism very quickly to the depth they desire. The unit has two distinct indicators on the depth adjustment gauge. The top one shows the depth when on top of the track and the bottom indicator shows when the unit is not on the track. The mechanism also had a micro-adjust feature. This allows the user to dial in the depth of cut with very precise accuracy. There is a black knob on the top that the user can simply spin in or out to adjust the depth of cut. Festool had a patent on their front splinterguards. These provide a zero-clearance cut for zero chip out.

Total depth of cut at 90 degrees WITH the track – 51mm

Total depth of cut at 45 degrees WITH the track – 43mm

     

Close to the Wall Cutting

A tracksaw can also be used without the track. A tracksaw is merely a pimped out circular saw with a special base that allows it to go on a track to perform laser like precision straight cuts. Many folks use them without the track for various applications. One major application is close to the wall cutting. When installing a hardwood floor, you may want to flush all the boards up and provide a nice crisp clean ending or just provide the necessary expansion joint if it is raw wood. All the saws have a close the wall cutting capacity. This means the right side of the blade guard is flat and can be rested up against a wall and have nice registration surface to make a “straight” cut a long the wall.

Dewalt 60v FLEXVOLT Tracksaw

  • Anti-marring pads – Yes
  • Distance the blade is from the wall – 9/16″

Makita 36v x2 Tracksaw

  • Anti-marring pads – No
  • Distance the blade is from the wall – 11/16″

Festool TSC 55 Tracksaw

  • Anti-marring pads – No
  • Distance the blade is from the wall – 3/8″

Stock blade and Changing the blade

USUALLY, the blades that come with a power tool is junk and should be replaced with a premium blade from the manufacturer or an aftermarket third party company that specializes in blades. With the three units and manufacturers that we tested today, all the but on the units had phenomenal blades in them. But with that being said, that other blade is great for another application. We will get to that below.

Changing the blade is something a user won’t do very often, at least we don’t. When the blade gets dull or it gets run through a nail on some rustic projects it, of course, needs to be replaced but for the 95% of the applications, a tracksaw will be used for, a quality crosscutting blade for sheet good material is the way to go. However, if you are someone that prefers the correct blade for the job, swapping out blades could get very frequent. From rough cutting lumber to cross cutting plywoods, those two types of applications are completely different and if you would like perfect quality, you need to put in the correct blade for the application. We will touch on the stock blade and briefly run through changing the blade on each unit.

Dewalt 60v FLEXVOLT Tracksaw

Stock blade specifications – 48 tooth.  Did not cross cut plywood to achive a clean tear-out free cut.

Changing the blade on the Dewalt 60v FLEXBOLT tracksaw was the most cumbersome between the three units we tested. With saying that, it wasn’t difficult at all it just was a bit more effort and confusing the first few times you do it. Of course, after you do it a few times it becomes natural. The user must press down the black button on the top of the motor in between the blade housing/guard and the grip. Then plunge the saw down until it stops and locks in place. Then rotate the black lever next to the button that you just pressed. When you have the Allen wrench in the bolt, press down the black lever to lock the arbor. This will lock the arbor so you can turn the bolt without it spinning. Reverse the process to get it back to a ready to use state.

Makita 36v x2 Tracksaw

Stock blade specifications – 55 tooth. .063″ kerf. 20mm arbor. Excellent for veneer plywood and other cross cutting applications.

Changing the blade on the Makita 36v x2 tracksaw was nearly tied with the Festool TSC 55 tracksaw. Both mechanisms are extremely simple and easy to use. On the Makita unit, simply press the plunge release button on the top of the handle and plunge forward until the rod is near the teal colored disc on the plunge mechanism scale. Rotate that disc out of the way till a full hole is formed. Then released the plunge button and the plunge mechanism is locked at a perfect distance to gain access to the arbor bolt. When you have the Allen wrench in the bolt, press down on the black lever in between the handle and the blade housing/guard. This will lock the arbor so you can turn the bolt without it spinning. Reverse the process to get it back to a ready to use state.

 

Festool TSC 55 Tracksaw

Stock blade specifications – 48 tooth. 2.2mm kerf. 20mm arbor. 5 deg hook angle. ATB. Excellent for veneer plywood and other cross cutting applications.

As mentioned above, the Festool TSC 55 and the Makita 36v x2 tracksaw nearly tied in the blade change mechanism and procedure department. Festool is known for their FASTFIX system. Simply pull up on the Festool green lever just in front of the main handle and the foregrip. Then plunge the saw until it clicks and locks in place. The blade arbor automatically locks in place and that is where it simply edges ahead of the Makita unit. Reverse the process to get it back to a ready to use state.

Power and Runtime

This is where the corded Festool TS55 model was brought into play. We wanted to see how the battery powered units faired up against the world renowned Festool TS55. In addition to the power, we tested the units run time and see how many cuts we could make on an 8′ length of 3/4″ (~18mm) plywood.

When comparing the power of the cordless models to the corded Festool model, we were very impressed with the TSC 55 and the FLEXVOLT tracksaw. The Makita seemed to bog down a bit when making those full depth cuts. Now to no one’s fault but Andy’s, he thought the saw blade arbor on the Festool TSC 55 was different than the Makita and the Dewalt units. He had it in his mind they were different from his experience in working with aftermarket blades on the Festool Kapex. That has a different arbor size than a traditional miter saw. We did swap the blades in the Makita and Dewalt thinking the higher tooth count would cause the unit to bog down more in those ripping applications. We MAYBE saw a little improvement over the premium Dewalt blade we had installed in the Dewalt unit but it was negligible and not really noticeable. We felt the Dewalt and Festool cordless models have the same power as the corded unit with the Makita being slightly behind. Keep in mind, it could handle those situations with a dedicated ripping blade.

We tested runtime on the units simply by making repeated 8′ rips on a sheet of 3/4″ plywood. Rip after rip we saw the battery gauges go down and the saw would continue to cut. Eventually, the battery powered units would completely quit. We would mark how many cuts it would make. We have also provided the linear feet accumulation below. When testing the corded Festool TS55 for runtime, we simply ran out of material. 🙂

*We used the 6.0Ah battery in the FLEXVOLT unit due to comfort. This was a huge disadvantage to the unit but we saw no other way as that is how we would use it in the real world. We will touch on that in the comfort and ergonomics section below.

Dewalt 60v FLEXVOLT Tracksaw

Battery information – One 6.0 60v FLEXVOLT battery

Runtime Performance* – 13 cuts or 104′

Makita 36v x2 Tracksaw

Battery information – Two 5.0 Ah 18v LXT batteries

Runtime Performance – 21.5 cuts or 258′

Festool TSC 55 Tracksaw

Battery information – Two 5.2Ah 18v batteries

Runtime Performance – 30 cuts or 360′

Tracks (Anti-tearout edges, Anti-Kickback Mechanism, Track Clamps)

You would think the tracks that come with a tracksaw are pretty much the same. In our in-depth look at the three cordless tracksaw that we tested, we took a closer look at the actual tracks themselves and features on the saws that interacted with the tracks. When looking at the tracks, we looked at the following:

  • Anti-tearout cutting edges
  • Anti-kickback mechanism
  • Track clamps
  • Track length
  • Adjusting the zero play mechanisms

Dewalt 60v FLEXVOLT Tracksaw

The Dewalt tracks are the best in our opinion. The double-edged track provides the user with two cutting edges. This means the user can use one for beveling and one for 90-degree cuts. They could also simply wait to use the second side until the first side wears out.

In addition to the double cutting edges, the Dewalt 60v FLEXVOLT tracksaw itself has an anti-kickback feature that interacts with the track to prevent kickback. A simple knob on the base of the saw will activate the anti-kickback feature. It activates a wedging mechanism that prevents the saw from going backwards on the track. This is extremely safe when using the saw to plunge in the middle of a piece of material rather than plunging off the material and then entering.

Dewalt’s clamps are similar to their squeeze clamps with special heads on them to fit into the track channel. These are our favorite clamps when working on an elevated surface like sawhorses or our Centipede workstation. The biggest negative about the Dewalt track clamps is they need verticle room under the material. The Dewalt track clamps are interchangeable with other manufacturers of tracks.

Track length is very important, we find that they are never quite long enough to plunge the saw off the material and exit the saw off the material. Whether that is for cross-cutting or ripping 4×8 foot sheets of plywood. We find the Dewalt tracks are very similar. It boggles our minds on why they can’t make them a few inches longer to make the user experience better.

The zero play mechanisms on the Dewalt FLEXVOLT tracksaw is by far the most difficult and cumbersome to use out of the three tracksaws we tested. You need an Allen wrench or screwdriver to do it and the resistance of the mechanism makes it extremely difficult to get it right in the first couple tries.

Dewalt was the less smooth of the three units when gliding on the track. We are not sure if this is due to the hard zero play mechanism and tough to get it dialed in or if the glide strips on the competitive model are better.

Makita 36v x2 Tracksaw

Makitas track is a standard single edge track that has a couple advantages over the others. Once, their tracks seem to be longer than normal solving the problem of the short tracks that were mentioned above.

Second, the Makita tracksaw has a locking lever on the base of the saw that will lock the unit to the track and prevent it from tipping. This is excellent when working with beveled cuts.

Makita’s track clamps are just like an F-style clamp and those too need vertical room for the clamp.

The zero play mechanism on the Makita 36v x2 Tracksaw is excellent. Large knobs that are easy to turn without a tool. The user can quickly and easily set the tracksaw to have zero play on the track.

We also found that the Makita road the smoothest on the track.

Festool TSC 55 Tracksaw

The Festool tracks have set the standard for the longest time. They seem to be standard and nothing special about them.

Festool has multiple options for track clamps. First, they have two type of F-style clamps. The first is the tradition screw handle type and the second has a ratcheting mechanism. The third had a squeeze type clamping action that can be pivoted sideways and is extremely low-profile.

The zero play mechanism on the Festool TSC 55 is just as easy as the Makita unit. Large knobs that are easy to turn and you don’t need a tool. The user can quickly and easily set the tracksaw to have zero play on the track.

The Festool TSC 55 road very smooth on the Festool tracks. Better than the Dewalt but not as easily as the Makita.

Dust collection

Dust collection on any power tool is extremely important to us. Whether you are in the workshop or on the job site, a tracksaw needs to have the ability to collect most of the dust it produces. Specific items we will cover on each unit when discussing dust collection are:

  • Factory claimed dust collection efficiency
  • Holes that can be covered to increase efficiency
  • Accessories that can be added to increase efficiency
  • Hose port

Dewalt 60v FLEXVOLT Tracksaw

Factory claimed dust collection efficiency – 90%

The Dewalt FLEXVOLT tracksaw has the center hole where the user can gain access to the arbor bolt. This area can be taped off to increase the dust collection.

No known accessories available to increase dust collection.

Makita 36v x2 Tracksaw

Factory claimed dust collection efficiency – Unknown

No known accessories to increase dust collection.

Festool TSC 55 Tracksaw

Factory claimed dust collection efficiency – Unknown

The TSC 55 by Festool has a center hole where the user can gain access to the arbor bolt. This area can be taped off to increase the dust collection. Festool also offers a cover plate (ABSA-TS 55) to help increase the saw’s dust collection efficiency.

Grip Ergonomics/Comfort

A tracksaw can be a tool that is used extensively when doing specific jobs or applications. When these types of applications pop up, you find yourself behind the unit for extended periods of time. We found grip ergonomics and comfort was extremely important. Specifics on the grip ergonomics and comfort we will be covering are:

  • Rubber over-mold
  • Trigger size
  • Grip girth
  • Plunge mechanism

Dewalt 60v FLEXVOLT Tracksaw

The Dewalt tracksaw had rubber over-mold all the way up and around the main grip. The foregrip had rubber over-mold as well. This makes the unit comfortable to grab and help prevent slipping. The trigger on the unit has the largest two-fingered trigger of the three units. The pressure required to pull the trigger might be slightly more than the other two units. The grip girth is the largest of the units and that is both good and bad. First, we light to grab something that fills the hand. Second, that larger girth makes your hand stick out more than normal. With the larger single FLEXVOLT battery powering this unit, we found the battery really hits your knuckles and makes it extremely uncomfortable. We refuse to run the unit with a 9.0Ah battery and have dedicated a 6.0Ah battery when testing the unit. The plunge

The grip girth is the largest of the units and that is both good and bad. First, we light to grab something that fills the hand. Second, that larger girth makes your hand stick out more than normal. With the larger single FLEXVOLT battery powering this unit, we found the battery really hits your knuckles and makes it extremely uncomfortable. We refuse to run the unit with a 9.0Ah battery and have dedicated a 6.0Ah battery when testing the unit. The plunge

The plunge mechanism requires the most effort and that is a combination of the longer plunge safety mechanism and the parallel mechanism the saw has.

Makita 36v x2 Tracksaw

The Makita tracksaw has rubber over-mold on the main handle and foregrip. It also features a large two-finger trigger that is very easy to pull when compared with the Dewalt FLEXVOLT model. T

The girth of the grip is a little deeper but skinnier than the Dewalt.

The plunge mechanism is extremely easy with the simple push button and single pivot point.

We would put the Makita in the leader position in this department.

 

Festool TSC 55 Tracksaw

The Festool TSC 55 has rubber over-mold only on the back of the grip where the center of your palm would go and nothing on the foregrip.

The grip girth is very similar to the Makita model with the large two-fingered trigger being right in the middle of the Dewalt and Makita units for the effort to pull it.

The plunge mechanism is very smooth with a simple lever that is easy to push with your thumb.

 

Battery platform compatibility

When purchasing a cordless power tool, you want to know what battery platform it is going to run on. This is extremely important for the user for multiple reasons. First, are they already invested in that battery platform? Do they want to add another battery and charger to their shop or job site? Second, the dependability and reputation of that battery platform. And lastly, how many tools does that brand or battery platform have to utilize the same batteries on different tools?

Dewalt 60v FLEXVOLT Tracksaw

Dewalt’s FLEXVOLT line is brand new. They are bringing new tools to that lineup everyday to utilize the 40v and 60v power capacity but time will tell what that final number will be. We are well aware of the FLEXVOLT line being able to be cross-compatible with the 20v tools but who want a ginormous battery on their impact drill or drill driver? We certainly do not! We are confident in Dewalt to continue adding to their FLEXVOLT lineup and fill out that battery platform for their users but we currently feel that battery would be sitting on the charger more than in a tool.

Makita 36v x2 Tracksaw

With the world largest 18v battery platform, Makita is here to stay. With their strategic move to release their x2 lineup, Makita has positioned its 18v battery platform to be the leader in the number of tools it can offer the consumer. Instead of having a dedicated battery platform, that is typically a single larger battery, for OPE (outdoor power equipment), Makita has decided to utilize their 18volt batteries and just put two of them on a tool. This creates an x2 or 36volt tool that is extremely convenient for the consumer that is invested in Makita.

In our current position in our shop, Makita would win in this department.

Festool TSC 55 Tracksaw

Festool is well-known for being the elite tool brand for the professional. If you are one that has a Festool product, you most likely don’t just have one. The quality, engineering, and customer service that goes with these tools are just phenomenal. With that being said, over in the states, I don’t see a lot of contractors that are exclusively Festool. In addition to that, when you compare Dewalt’s 18v or Makita’s 18v tool lineup, Festool couldn’t fill one shelf. Festool is now committed to bringing more cordless tools to the market to utilize their 18v battery but we feel their platform lacks the volume of tools for one to win this category.

Price

Price is always a huge factor when weighing into buy a new tool.

Dewalt 60v FLEXVOLT Tracksaw – ACME Tools: $579 

Includes:

  • FLEXVOLT Tracksaw
  • 9.0 Ah FLEXVOLT battery
  • 48 tooth fine finishing blade
  • Wrench
  • 59-inch track
  • T-stack storage bin

Makita 36v x2 Tracksaw – AMAZON: $409

Includes:

  • 36v x2 Tracksaw
  • 6-1/2″ 48T Carbide-Tipped Saw Blade (B-07353)
  • Hex Wrench (783203-8)
  • 55″ Guide Rail (194368-5)
  • Stackable Tool Case (00000)

Festool TSC 55 Tracksaw – AMAZON: $785

Includes:

  • TSC 55 Tracksaw
  • 48-tooth blade
  • SYS 5 Systainer

Conclusion

We have certainly covered these tools from top to bottom and inside and out. We have established category winners above but it is now time to jump to the finish line and decide what our pick would be if we were to go out and buy one of these models. We would first highly recommend an interested party to get out to an elite contractors store that offers each of these units and get them in your hands. Ask the store to try them out and make a few cuts. Testing them first-hand is the best way to realize which unit will work for you.

We have established three items that helped us decide which unit was right for us:

  1. Battery Platform
  2. Frequency of use
  3. Cost

Battery platform is extremely important to us. Before we started doing tool reviews, we were brand loyal to Makita and that was for a few simple points. First, the battery and chargers were all under one platform and it was easy to utilize the same battery across many of the tools we had. Second, the tools performed how we needed them to. They could live up to the abuse of a production cabinet shop. Third, tool expansion was very important to us. Makita has the largest 18-volt tool lineup in the world. It is comforting to know that if a tool was needed in a specific trade, you can count on Makita bringing one to the market eventually. They might not be first, but they will get it to you eventually.

The frequency of use is a big factor when considering a new tool. You can purchase a tool that may not have all the features as the competition but that is okay because you won’t be using it as often. The more you use the tool, the more features and better specifications you want out of the tool to make using it more enjoyable and your results even better.

Cost is always a bit factor when considering a new tool. The three models we reviewed today have some separation in them with Makita being the most affordable and Festool being the most expensive.

DRUM ROLLLLLLLLLLLL

If we were to review our situation before becoming a tool reviewer, we would have to take into the three criteria points above. Battery platform would take the biggest role followed by the Frequency of use. The cost wasn’t an issue as it is imperative we have one and two covered. As we are so heavily invested into the Makita battery platform and our high frequency of use, we would choose the Makita 36v x2 tracksaw as the winner of this tracksaw shootout.

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4 Responses to “Cordless Tracksaw Comparison | Makita 36v vs Dewalt 60v Vs Festool 36v”

  1. BikerDad #

    The price and link for the Makita is wrong. That’s for the CORDED model. The Makita ends up more expensive than the DeWalt, because the Makita does NOT come with a track.

    An interesting review, but I think that there’s one other factor that has to be considered, or an existing factor that should be explored more thoroughly. Specifically, the cost to be fully prepared to rip a sheet of plywood. NOT crosscut, rip. To do that, you either have to purchase a second track and connector kit, or a second long single track.

    Very disappointing to hear about the interference issues with the DeWalt’s battery. I think DeWalt missed a fantastic opportunity here to take the tracksaw to the next level by incorporating the bestest features of saws on the market into a brand new model, rather than simply warming over their existing saw. Introduce the new saw along with a new tracks with lengths optimized for real world use, i.e. howza ’bout a track for 5’x5′ BB? hmmmm….

    September 14, 2017 at 5:38 pm Reply
  2. Glass #

    Prices for corded makita is 409. Cordless kit with no rail is 509 at acme. Also most other reviewers have makita as more powerful than festool. Also most reviewers have battery life much more equal on all 3 saws. What about cut quality? Most other reviewers have not commented about such poor ergonomics on Dewalt. Also these are cordless, so the festool has a big advantage as it can be used cordless with its effective dust bag, the others not so much. Did you not find the makita rail adjuster finicky and in need of constant adjustment especially when using joined rails while the festool work flawlessly. Turn them upside down check out the difference.

    September 18, 2017 at 6:09 am Reply
  3. Nick #

    Where did you get the retractable/expandable suction hose that is shown in the video when comparing the dust extraction?

    January 17, 2018 at 11:01 pm Reply

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