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Thread: Confused in choosing a welding course

  1. Top | #1
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    Confused in choosing a welding course

    hi guys,
    Which certification do I need to choose to get a welding job? I have completed my high school graduation and when I went for the interviews for welding, they are asking whether I had done any certifications for any particular field. They asked me to get certification course and I am confused about it. I have seen a list of courses but confused in choosing one. Which course should I choose? Which one might have more scope in getting a jobs?

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  3. Top | #2
    Senior Member sir_malaki's Avatar
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    First off I'm not a classroom trained welder, I'm just your average farm boy caliber. I learned from my grandfather, father, uncle, brothers, and on my own. I am a teacher by trade, though, I have a bachelor and masters in education. From what I know from both sides is to start with your basic courses.

    First off, do you have any welding experience? I know a guy that went through trade school and received his first/basic certification and come to find out he didn't like welding all day as a career. If you have had any experience this is great because you know, or if you don't know you will learn quick, it can be a tedious, hot, smelly, uncomfortable job sometimes. Second I would talk to various companies in your area to find out what they are looking for. Then take that information to your school of choice. The counselors at the school will help you decide on what path to take.

    Speaking as a teacher and what I know of welding, I can't tell you what to take with such little information. The big thing is what types of jobs have you been applying for or looking at. Different jobs require different welding techniques. Are the jobs indoors or outdoors, what type of metals are being welded, are they pressure sensitive such as tanks and pipes, does it require special equipment like underwater magnesium welding or thermite welding? This is information that you should have in mind when deciding on what path to take. As I said the best place to start is at the beginning. Get in touch with companies and your school of choice and they will help you find the correct path.

    As a side note, when you do figure it out and start taking classes take as many extra classes as you can on the side. You may find something else you may like. Don't shy away from math, metallurgy, design, art, technical writing, and others. All these thing can help you progress and climb the career ladder.
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  4. Top | #3
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    You can choose a Pipe Welding course. It has a heavy demand in anywhere...

    Many Industrial pipes are in use in dozens of industries around the world. They carry gas, water, chemicals, and more, through cities and in rural areas.
    They are also in constant need of repair. Damage and deterioration can be detrimental. Sometimes maintenance is preventative, to keep the pipes running properly. Other times the repair is after a disaster has struck.
    In these cases, repairs need to be made quickly to keep the damage and loss of profit from growing. These repairs may involve working in treacherous, high-stress situations.The constant need for maintenance and repairs and the sheer number of industries that rely on industrial pipes make this one of the highest paying welding jobs available.

    To enter this field, you’ll need to learn to work fast and efficiently (but safely!). You may be forced to make quick repairs that need to be of sound quality to prevent future damage.You’ll also be working for companies that have a lot on the line. Mistakes can mean a huge loss of profit, and possibly even damage to a company’s image.

    Thanks....

  5. Top | #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by sir_malaki View Post
    First off I'm not a classroom trained welder, I'm just your average farm boy caliber. I learned from my grandfather, father, uncle, brothers, and on my own. I am a teacher by trade, though, I have a bachelor and masters in education. From what I know from both sides is to start with your basic courses.

    First off, do you have any welding experience? I know a guy that went through trade school and received his first/basic certification and come to find out he didn't like welding all day as a career. If you have had any experience this is great because you know, or if you don't know you will learn quick, it can be a tedious, hot, smelly, uncomfortable job sometimes. Second I would talk to various companies in your area to find out what they are looking for. Then take that information to your school of choice. The counselors at the school will help you decide on what path to take.

    Speaking as a teacher and what I know of welding, I can't tell you what to take with such little information. The big thing is what types of jobs have you been applying for or looking at. Different jobs require different welding techniques. Are the jobs indoors or outdoors, what type of metals are being welded, are they pressure sensitive such as tanks and pipes, does it require special equipment like underwater magnesium welding or thermite welding? This is information that you should have in mind when deciding on what path to take. As I said the best place to start is at the beginning. Get in touch with companies and your school of choice and they will help you find the correct path.

    As a side note, when you do figure it out and start taking classes take as many extra classes as you can on the side. You may find something else you may like. Don't shy away from math, metallurgy, design, art, technical writing, and others. All these thing can help you progress and climb the career ladder.
    Best is to inquire at your local trade schools, union trade schools, colleges and industrial art program. Do your research before you commit to a program and watch out for big talkers, big costs and big promises. In some cases a potential employer! May help pay for your certification.
    Tig, mig , laser, stick and others are being done frequently. Pipeline is always a good, but working conditions may not be the best. When you interview for jobs and the employer say you need certification, ask where and which certification they desire.
    Just remember, that you as a candidate have just as much a right to ask questions also. All the potential employer may say is no, but you likely won't be offered the job.
    Lastly, getting a certification to get a job is step one, you the continue to build on addional welding skills for other certifications.

    No I'm not a welder, but have done some as a hobby, I am a seasoned old fart that has been in many places and offering advice. Tom



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