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Thread: stick vs tig vs mig

  1. Top | #11
    Senior Member donnymcarter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Belg View Post
    Donny, thanks for that could you perhaps recommend an older/budget friendlier model which I might be able to find used thats in the same category? Also what is the significance of the number at the end of the model # I see 140 180 210 as in your link? Is Hobart a well respected name in welding? How about something like this Lincoln Electric Pro MIG 180 Wire Feed Welder 02 L200174A | eBay
    The numbers on the end represent amperage. The Lincoln welder you linked is a good welder and if bought near that price would be a great deal! I had this Hobart for a long time and could weld 1/2 plate with now worries if I slightly heated the metal first.

    I just looked at HF and saw this 180a welder. Reviews are good and the price is better especially if you can grab a 20% coupon! I would definitely use gas if you can.
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    http://donnycarter.com/

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  3. Top | #12
    avj
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    The biggest thing I can suggest for learning how to weld... auto dimming helmet!!!
    Even in trade school they still start you off with big old helmet and dark lens.
    Amazing when you can SEE how much easier it is to learn.

    Cheers
    AJ
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  4. Top | #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by avj View Post
    The biggest thing I can suggest for learning how to weld... auto dimming helmet!!!
    I have tried an auto dimming helmet, but I could not see when it dimmed.

    I'm thinking a regular helmet might be better for those of us who may be a bit older - as we age, the time it takes our eyes to adjust to changes in light increases. It seems like my eyes don't adjust quickly enough with an auto dimming helmet, so I am wondering if a regular helmet might work better for me.

    I had one welding lesson from a friend - and my biggest problem was that I could not see what I was doing. I have not tried a regular helmet yet, so I don't know if it will be better or not.

  5. Top | #14
    avj
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    Don't be scared to put a big halogen light on the piece you are welding...
    for some reason it shows off where you are going a lot better (even though the welder throws off
    lots of light)

    Cheers
    AJ
    1paulfx and donnymcarter like this.

  6. Top | #15
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    The welder does not throw off any light unless you are striking an arc. That is when halogen lamps help too. I can use two sometimes, if I really want to see what I am doing. I'll position the lamps in front of me so they do not light inside my hood. I do not like getting reflection from my welding lens. Sometimes to stop that back lighting effect I'll drape a spare welding jacket bib over my hood, to block light from entering the back of it.

  7. Top | #16
    Senior Member Echo2's Avatar
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    As far as auto darkening shields go...buy quality....Miller...Lincoln...Jackson...etc....you 'll play the gambling game buying the HF models (or buy the ext warranty)

    Look for one that does not use proprietary cover plates.

    A helpful hint for seeing where you are welding....scribe your stop lines....width of weave...and length of weld.

    The best spool gun I have used is a Miller 30A...I keep a machine set up with one...a millermatic 251.

    First thing I do with my machines...is change the diffusers to accept standard Tweeco tips....so all machines use the same expendables.

  8. Top | #17
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    I have an Optrel auto darkening hood. The Swiss make pretty good stuff. I wouldn't worry about the hood breaking down either, but rather my eyes.

  9. Top | #18
    Senior Member 200mph's Avatar
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    MIG may be easiest to learn, but its is also easiest to screw up with under-penetrated welds. Generaly speaking if stick weld looks good it is good (unlike MIG weld).

  10. Top | #19
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    Personally stick was way easier to start learning my welds

    Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk


 
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