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Thread: Tools Everone Should Own

  1. Top | #11
    Premium Member cdnvet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Belg View Post
    Brian, the problem I see with this if someone has never any experience with the tool how does one know if they want it?? I have a variety of Dewalt, Bosch, Porter Cable, and Milwaukee but couldn't tell you which of their newer models I would like better. Free tools are the best!!! ;-)
    I know where you are going with this but on this site we have everyone from all experience levels. This is a great idea Brian then those who are just starting out will have a better idea of what to choose. As we know brand names do make a big difference.
    Brian likes this.
    WHAT IS AN ASKHOLE?

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    yet always does the exact opposite of what you told them.

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  3. Top | #12
    Administrator Brian's Avatar
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    OK.... I just wanted to giveaway tools.
    A.F.S.

    On a scale of 1 to 10........ Be an 11.

  4. Top | #13
    Resident Geezer Twin Oaks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian View Post
    OK.... I just wanted to giveaway tools.
    That's ok my friend. Just pack up that big ass Dewalt 2 stage compressor & send it to me.
    I will take it off your hands only to make you feel better.
    Brian and cdnvet like this.


  5. Top | #14
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    I think a hammer and obviously a good broom and dustpan.

  6. Top | #15
    Administrator Brian's Avatar
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    I have really been thinking about this thread. I have family in Wisconsin with a new to them home, few skills and zero tools. Really, what should people start with.... Using him as an example:

    1. A decent screwdriver set. Not Junk because it would be more frustrating to them.
    2. A Hammer (and nails) to fix small issues but more likely to hang pictures.
    3. A small mechanics set with sockets and wrenches.
    4. This one scares me, but small adjustable wrenches for plumbing.


    Then what? I think next is a drill and bits?
    A.F.S.

    On a scale of 1 to 10........ Be an 11.

  7. Top | #16
    Senior Member sir_malaki's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian View Post
    I have really been thinking about this thread. I have family in Wisconsin with a new to them home, few skills and zero tools. Really, what should people start with.... Using him as an example:

    1. A decent screwdriver set. Not Junk because it would be more frustrating to them.
    2. A Hammer (and nails) to fix small issues but more likely to hang pictures.
    3. A small mechanics set with sockets and wrenches.
    4. This one scares me, but small adjustable wrenches for plumbing.


    Then what? I think next is a drill and bits?
    If you are looking for people with little skill they will not need top of the line tools, I would start them out with this kit

    https://www.amazon.com/BLACK-DECKER-...wners+tool+kit

    I've used the Black & Decker 20v drills and they are nice, good for average home owners. Like most 20v systems they have multiple tools that use that battery as well. They are also carried at Wal-mart and other big box stores so batteries and accessories are easy to find.

    Then add this on

    https://www.amazon.com/Craftsman-56-...D5PGQP2AMDRT93

    this has the metric & standard universals so it will take almost any nut and bolt out there, also has allen wrenches.
    Last edited by sir_malaki; 09-02-2016 at 10:00 AM.
    ... I didn't do it!

  8. Top | #17
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    Maybe I'm just weird but one tool I use constantly today is an angle grinder. OK I have a bench full of angle grinders. Because they're so handy, and I don't like changing the accessories. Another tool I'd add to their list is a speed square. Starting to use one of those changed my life. Before that I couldn't cut a piece of wood square with a circular saw to save my life. Now I can make square cuts with my eyes closed. For me a speed square has been a game changer.
    JustSomeGuy and sir_malaki like this.

  9. Top | #18
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    Would any of you like to try out my Speed Square Holder for free? msg me an address to send one to and try a locally made product. go to my web site to see the product. ezsquareholder.com and help a woodworker like me get the work out. Thanks in advance!

  10. Top | #19
    Senior Member Texan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SamuelReg77 View Post
    I'm a novice when it comes to woodworking. I've decided to install hardwood floor in the upper floor of my home as well as on the stairs. I'm using 1/2" maple plywood for the panels and bought a plywood blade for cutting. However, I find that when I try to cut the trim (which is made of solid wood) with the same blade it has a tendency to burn the wood while cutting. I assume I just need a blade with fewer teeth but what would be a good blade to select for this purpose. I also want a good clean cut. So I discovered some good miter saw blades here . Just try to figure out which one to opt for
    When cutting solid wood, it depends on which way you are cutting. When cutting with the grain, i.e. rip cuts, you want a low tooth count blade with large gullets. This allows the blade to have enough room to hold the saw dust before exiting the wood. If you are cutting against the grain, i.e. a crosscut, you want a higher tooth count blade.

  11. Top | #20
    Senior Member 2LaneCruzer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1paulfx View Post
    Maybe I'm just weird but one tool I use constantly today is an angle grinder. OK I have a bench full of angle grinders. Because they're so handy, and I don't like changing the accessories. Another tool I'd add to their list is a speed square. Starting to use one of those changed my life. Before that I couldn't cut a piece of wood square with a circular saw to save my life. Now I can make square cuts with my eyes closed. For me a speed square has been a game changer.
    Besides my woodworking tools, I vote for a variable speed grinder. I have a very old Chinese made bench grinder that runs like a bat out of you-know-where. Got where I was afraid to use it, especially on small objects. The variable speed grinder is just the ticket. You don't often need to grind at an incredibly high speed; I was reminded of this when I saw a picture of a guy with a broken piece of the grindstone stuck in his forehead.
    Have wings, will travel


 
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