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Thread: Dryer connection. Ok to use Oven Range cord?

  1. #1
    Premium Member Rubenk's Avatar
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    Dryer connection. Ok to use Oven Range cord?

    So I've moved into my new house. I went to hook up the clothes dryer and found that my 3 prong plug did not work. There is a 3 prong outlet typically found for Ovens in the laundry room. Picked up the new cord for my Dryer, but just wanted to make sure it was OK to use on that. From what i've read the oven cord is heavier and safe to use. But I wasnt sure if they were wired differently for when I install the new cord on the dryer.

    In the picture, the one on the right is the "oven" plug I bought and want to make sure its ok to use. The left one is the currently installed cord that worked at my apartment. And the brown plug is what my house has installed.

    Can I use my new cord, or MUST I get a new plug installed in the house?

    Thanks!!!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Dryer connection. Ok to use Oven Range cord?-image-2013-07-12.jpg   Dryer connection. Ok to use Oven Range cord?-img_20130714_095411_630.jpg   Dryer connection. Ok to use Oven Range cord?-img_20130714_095924_562.jpg  

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  3. #2
    Premium Member cdnvet's Avatar
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    You may want to take a better look at your plugs. There is a major difference in the bottom blade types in your photos.

    Generally a stove is a 30 Amp plug and receptacle and a dryer is usually a 50 Amp plug and receptacle. You would have to make sure your wire and plug is properly rated to take those loads.
    All the voices in my head are silent....

    I really hate that as I can't figure out what they are planning next.

  4. #3
    Administrator Brian's Avatar
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    What amp breaker is on that plug?

  5. #4
    Premium Member Rubenk's Avatar
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    Everything i've read says that dryers use 30 amp and stoves use 50 amp.

    The dryer is on a 30 amp breaker.

  6. #5
    Premium Member cdnvet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rubenk View Post
    Everything i've read says that dryers use 30 amp and stoves use 50 amp.

    The dryer is on a 30 amp breaker.
    Oops (professional opinion) you are right I put them in the wrong order. But by the looks of the photos your dryer plug has a L shaped blade and your stove has a flat blade.

    I copied this from a electrical site:

    "There is absolutely no reason -- electrically speaking -- not to power a 30-amp dryer from a 50-amp circuit, assuming correct voltages. The obvious configuration differences between standard range pigtails and standard dryer pigtails are to prevent folks from plugging ranges into dryer circuits, NOT the other way around. BY FAR the simplest, cheapest, fastest, easiest way to go is to just go buy a range pigtail for the dryer -- five minutes tops to remove the dryer pigtail and replace it, and the job is done.

    Electrical appliances are not force-fed current; they draw it. That is why your desk lamp, which might draw half an amp of current, doesn't explode when you energize it on a 15-amp circuit. That is why you can run your 30-amp dryer on a 50-amp circuit safely and efficiently until the end of time (or until the dryer dies of other causes)."
    All the voices in my head are silent....

    I really hate that as I can't figure out what they are planning next.

  7. #6
    Premium Member Rubenk's Avatar
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    Thanks for the info! I did google around a bit, but couldnt get my wording correct.

    I'll swap the pigtails and cross my fingers!

  8. #7
    Administrator Brian's Avatar
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    You should be fine to use the 50 amp plug for a 30 amp appliance. I would not use a 30 amp plug for a 50 amp appliance.

    With that said, I think its good that you have a 30 amp breaker, even with the 50 amp plug. While you can without issue run a 30 amp appliance on a 50 amp breaker, you will not trip the 50 amp breaker if something is slowly going wrong in your appliance and it draws 35 amps. I think the strict electricians would try to match up a 30 amp appliance with a 30 amp breaker. I have been having this same discussion with my electrician and its not been easy for me to understand.

  9. #8
    Senior Member dieselshadow's Avatar
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    The code requires the breaker sized for the wire used, not the appliance. This is to protect the wiring and prevent an electrical fire within your homes electrical system. Certain regions will dictate size of circuit and breaker size, and sometimes even the outlet. The appliance should have its own internal protection system, but not all do.
    cdnvet likes this.

  10. #9
    Senior Member Kennyd's Avatar
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    Most new dryers and stove/ovens use 4 wire plugs now so you get a separate neutral and ground, this is because of things like the lights and timers that only use 120v, so with only three conductors the ground becomes current-carrying and thats not allowed anymore.

    How old is this dryer? How old is this house?

    Here is a good reference for various plug/receptacle styles: Plug and Receptacle Configurations
    dieselshadow, mjncad and cdnvet like this.

  11. #10
    Premium Member harley130's Avatar
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    Unless you got the range cord free, it would be cheaper just to pickup a new standard dryer receptacle and replace it using your current cord. The 4 wire cords/plugs are the new code now but you do have to have a 4 conductor line coming from the box. Otherwise, there is no safety gain. The receptacle usually runs about $6 vs. $15 or more for the cord.
    cdnvet likes this.
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